Comments (3)
No. 1-3
Blindsay43
Blindsay43

Lucas power steering stop leak worked great for me. My 2006 F150 when I bought it had corrosion and dirty built up on the steering columns joints (after the firewall to the rack.) Rack didnt have any leaks visible. But was straining when the AC compressor clutch engaged. My model is notorious for the racks going out.

I replaced 12oz. Of my steering fluid with Lucas stop leak n cleaned up the steering column joint. Never had an issue after. Steering wheel spins silky smooth and the rack itself isn't making noise or binding.

The steering column needs cleaned & lubricanted first. The rust n dirt buildup will make it so hard on the rack it wouldn't matter much what you add if not taken care of prior to added it Hit those joints 4-5 times with a wire brush and brake cleaner. Then I preferred WD-40 Specialist White Lithium Grease Spray - Metal on Metal Lubricant and Corrosion Inhibitor to PB blaster Silicone lubricant but I used both in stages, hitting them twice a week for 2 weeks.

Blindsay43
Blindsay43

Lucas Power Steering Stop Leak, it solves all kinds of problems. My 2006 f150 has a rack that's notorious for going bad from corrosion and binding. No leaks somehow. When I got the truck I noticed right away, steering wheel was stiff when ac was on, straining the rack. Until turned off ac then smooth. Saw a mess of dirt n rust on the column joints. So I cleaned em up then I took out 12oz of the power steering fluid from the reservoir and added the one bottle of Lucas. Never had any problems afterwards, steering wheel is silk always now.

Here's what I did to prevent mine. From going out. Take a wire brush & brake cleaner to your steering columns joints. The steering column is just after the firewall n goes into rack. Rush buildup will make it so hard on the rack it wouldn't matter much what you add if not taken care of prior to added it.

Go over them each about 4-5 times then spray them with either wd40 silicone lubricanting spray or WD40 metal lubricant (designed for metal on metal) to keep them smooth as long as possible.