Glasses or Goggles?

For those of you who prefer to wear half or open-face helmets, you may get stuck thinking that sunglasses are your only option. Maybe you think goggles are for hipsters and guys who are trying too hard to look retro. Well, we’re not here to change your mind…just open it up a bit!

For those of you who prefer to wear half or open-face helmets, you may get stuck thinking that sunglasses are your only option. Maybe you think goggles are for hipsters and guys who are trying too hard to look retro. Well, we’re not here to change your mind…just open it up a bit!

There’s no denying that a good pair of face hugging glasses can provide decent glare redcution, keep dirt from finding it’s way into your eyeballs, and limit UV exposure. But glasses that provide that kind of all-around fit and protection don’t come cheap. Like the Oakley Turbine for $150.00 or the Rudy Project Guardyan for $300.00. Yeah, you read that right.

But one of the things a lot of riders suffer from when wearing sunglasses is dry eye. Yours truly being one of them. And that’s not a good thing. Over time, extensive dry eye can affect your vision and lead to pain, ulcers or scars on the cornea. How’s that for a good time? So the more you can keep the wind off your eyes, the less likely you’ll have those problems. Thus the reason goggles might be a better option.

Think about it. Dirt bike riders already know the benefits of goggles. So do skiers, snowboarders, and just about anyone who races anything on two or four wheels.
And you can get a decent pair for less than the cost of a new tire…or an expensive pair of sunglasses. Goggles for riding street bikes can run the gamut starting at below $15.00 for the Bobster Roadrunner. But as with anything, you get what you pay for.

Now of course, there’s one other solution — a full-face helmet with a tinted visor. But we’ll save that for another time.

Comments
No. 1-1
pete
pete

I feel like full-face is the smart, safe choice here

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