EBR Factory to liquidate everything!

Eric Buell tried to make it work, but the market didn't comply.

The motorcycle industry just lost another maker - Eric Buell Racing. While the company stopped making bikes some time ago, there was hope Eric would find investors who would help salvage the company. Didn't happen.
The entire factory, including racing parts and the machines that made them, will be auctioned off. Here's how it will work:

  • The onsite public liquidation at the EBR factory will be a piecemeal sale of parts, tools and historical items. It starts June 7 and continues for two months online, according to Liquid Asset Partners spokesperson Marissa Winter.
  • The live public auction, starting at 10 a.m. June 8 at the EBR factory and online, includes production equipment, test equipment and “numerous additional lots,” including EBR intellectual property as well as production tooling at suppliers worldwide.
  • More than $15 million (retail) worth of excess motorcycle parts inventory will be liquidated through discounting via a standard parts ordering process.

We can only hope Eric finds another way back at some point sooner than later.

Comments (4)
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Ironassjoe
Ironassjoe

Eric Buell has a brain for this style of bike. He will connect with others in the industry as a consultant in engine design. He is not done yet.

Jordan
Jordan

I'll definitely be checking this out! Sale starts 6/7 and live auction 6/8. Can't wait.

pete
pete

This sounds like the deal of a lifetime if you can make it out there

BrownRising
BrownRising

There's a small part of me that has always pined to ride a Buell but I could never quite pull the trigger on it. The price never really ever fit the style of riding as easily as buying comparable bikes and I think I feel like a lot of riders do about all of his attempts to make it in the mainstream motorcycling world. While part of me roots for his different approach, another part of me (who does digital product design for a living) knows that developing product for the fringes means you have a very small addressable market. And pricing a fringe product at premium levels makes it even harder to find market adoption. That part of me wishes he'd just make a great, different bike that all of us could love and ride.



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